Session H36: Focus Session: Environment II: Green Processes

8:00 AM–11:00 AM, Tuesday, February 28, 2012
Room: 107C

Sponsoring Unit: DCP
Chair: Ilja Siepmann, University of Minnesota, Don Baer, Pacific Northwest Research Laboratory, and James Hutchinson, University of Oregon

Abstract ID: BAPS.2012.MAR.H36.3

Abstract: H36.00003 : Carbon dioxide intercalation in Na-fluorohectorite clay at near-ambient conditions

8:48 AM–9:00 AM

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Authors:

  Jon Otto Fossum
    (Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  Henrik Hemmen
    (Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - NTNU)

  Erlend G. Rolseth
    (Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - NTNU)

  Davi Fonseca
    (Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - NTNU)

  Elisabeth Lindbo Hansen
    (Department of Physics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology - NTNU)

  Tomas Plivelic
    (MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, Sweden)

A molecular dynamics study by Cygan et al.[1] shows the possibility of intercalation and retention of CO$_{2}$ in smectite clays at 37 $^{o}$C and 200 bar, which suggests that clay minerals may prove suitable for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. In this work we show from x-ray diffraction measurements that gaseous CO$_{2}$ intercalates into the interlayer space of the synthetic smectite clay Na-fluorohectorite. The mean interlayer distance of the clay when CO$_{2}$ is intercalated is 12.5 {\AA} at {\-}20 \r{ }C and 15 bar. The magnitude of the expansion of the interlayer upon intercalation is indistinguishable from that of the dehydrated-monohydrated intercalation of H$_{2}$O, but this possibility is ruled out by careful repeating the measurements exposing the clay to nitrogen gas. The dynamics of the CO$_{2}$ intercalation process displays a higher intercalation rate at increased pressure, and the rate is several orders of magnitude slower than that of water or vapor at ambient pressure and temperature.\\[4pt] [1] Cygan, R. T.; Romanov, V. N.; Myshakin, E. M. \textit{Natural materials for carbon capture}; Techincal report SAND2010-7217; Sandia National Laboratories: Albuquerque, New Mexico, November, 2010.

To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2012.MAR.H36.3